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Unseen Robert Frank Photos of New York (via nevver)
Some of the arrestingly elegant shots that resulted could have been taken by other fresh-eyed art or fashion photographers of the day, like William Klein or Roy DeCarava or Lillian Bassman, who died Monday at 94. But other pictures – snapped seemingly midstride; decidedly grainier and blurrier than commercial work at the time; defined by seas of inky black and oceans of shiny reflective surfaces – are unmistakably the work of only one man: Robert Frank, who with his masterpiece “The Americans,” published the following year, was to change the course of photography.

“New York Is” began as an ad campaign, and the book was distributed in 1959, showcasing two dozen of Mr. Frank’s pictures alongside snappy, boosterish captions. While the book has long been known in scholarly and rare-book circles, where copies now change hands for several thousand dollars, the prints, negatives and contact sheets Mr. Frank made for the project were long thought to have been lost amid shuffles of storage rooms and picture archives at The New York Times.

Unseen Robert Frank Photos of New York (via nevver)

Some of the arrestingly elegant shots that resulted could have been taken by other fresh-eyed art or fashion photographers of the day, like William Klein or Roy DeCarava or Lillian Bassman, who died Monday at 94. But other pictures – snapped seemingly midstride; decidedly grainier and blurrier than commercial work at the time; defined by seas of inky black and oceans of shiny reflective surfaces – are unmistakably the work of only one man: Robert Frank, who with his masterpiece “The Americans,” published the following year, was to change the course of photography.

“New York Is” began as an ad campaign, and the book was distributed in 1959, showcasing two dozen of Mr. Frank’s pictures alongside snappy, boosterish captions. While the book has long been known in scholarly and rare-book circles, where copies now change hands for several thousand dollars, the prints, negatives and contact sheets Mr. Frank made for the project were long thought to have been lost amid shuffles of storage rooms and picture archives at The New York Times.

(via nevver)